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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
would have thought. think about bob moses, rosa parks, all of these people had these connections so i think there is a picture of african-american politics that is much more complicated than we want to acknowledge, and i think we've come to terms with our pasts and the disgrace of slavery by constructing a narrative that is about how slavery ends and about how freedom is ultimately realized so that the civil rights movement becomes the crucial end point, and episodes people, movements, that don't fit into that, are very problematic, and i think there's all sorts of scholars, across the political spectrum, who have an investment in denying it, and that's, i construct by that -- i had a lot of pushback of anything i've written -- i've had more pushback about that, but part of what i discovered is that the movement is still alive. there's a chapter in philadelphia. i organized a conference about three years ago on the unia scholarly conference, a small number of scholars to present work, but at the last minute, i advertised this in a local newspaper, and 150 people showed up. i mean we w
to the senator about that. first, we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in live stream land. we'll be taking your questions on hash tag "politico" breakfast. tweet us, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has beco
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
to him? >> oh, i've never been invited, so i don't know. [laughter] you're right, somebody there was. bob care row, i -- caro, i think. we look a lot alike. [laughter] as i like to say to bob, my guys all died really a long time ago. [laughter] it's a great question. joety cantor, the i think, has been writing on this in the times, and i think -- what i've heard about the obama dinners is, like all presidents, you know, you get behind that desk which is an unparalleled experience. as president kennedy said to david herbert donald one day, the great historian, donald comes in, there's been one of those rankings of presidents come out. kennedy didn't like it, and he said no one -- he pointed at his desk -- he said no one has a right to judge nip, even poor james buchanan who hasn't sat at that desk and seen what he's seen and dealt with what he's dealt with. [laughter] so, and i think there's a lot to that. on the louisiana purchase, the louisiana purchase led to the first really sustained secession thinking and movement in american history which was new england, because new england saw the
, the 63rd annual. [inaudible conversations] >> now joining us here is bob minzesheimer. i'm going to get you over here. you have the better light. i don't need to worry about that. how important are the national book awards in your view? >> well in the book world? very important. probably not quite as important as the pulitzers, but they're second to the pulitzer's, the most prestigious award, and they're trying to make them more of a cultural phenomenon. look the booker award thursday britain. >> do you comment on the finalists? >> well, i did -- i've always believed -- this is a strange thing. in britain, the bookies -- betting is legal in britain, and bookize set odd on the booker awards. we have nothing like that. and i thought, we should. try to make books more part of the popular culture. so my two predictions -- and i'm guessing because the judges or five people. each panel is five judges. five predictions that kevin powers, who has written a debut novel set in iraq, yellow bird, will be an upset in fiction, and an sold standby, robert caro, who has been on chance many tames, his
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
in the state. >> anybody want to comment? >> go ahead. >> i agree. with everything you said, bob. i think that we need more portability in registration and seeking ways we can get that person to a regular ballot. i think that's a problem, the provisional ballot whether it's the poll workers needing better access to database and making sure the election officials have enough phone lines for the poll workers to work with. it seemed to be dave connect when voters show up at improper locations, and then of course the folks say we should be doing everything we can could count every bullate -- every ballot. there's michigan that prevent someone from verifying the ballot and no reason states should be resisting that. >> i think you're totally right on, this statewide portability issue. that was juan of the most cynical laws i saw passed in 2010 and 2011. it wasn't solving any problem to say you had to reregister when you move and there's no reason you should have to do that. in addition, in early vote, there's no reason we can't systems in place where you can vote anywhere in a county. and in oh
-- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would first like to extend my sympathies to the scottish parliament members who can't be with here today. so here i am. >> we just heard fromsome fantastic points for and against but a few stand out in my mind. this is right that someone of our age, doing the exact same amount of work and the exact same profession can legally be paid substantially less than someone in their 30s? it is unacceptable when it's aged toward young people. will minimum wage help young people or aggravate youth unemployment. as we all know, 16 and 17-year-olds receive minimum wage. 18 and 17-year-olds receive more and anyone over 21 receive more. are we to take from this the government believes the 18 and 17-year-olds to be less hard working or 16 and 17 years are less hard working. i should hope not. it's also cut
for broad conversation. so with that let me know who is here with us the chief staff to governor bob macdonald and from the state of oklahoma where she is the chief of staff to governor mario and at the end, roxanne white joining us from the great state of colorado where she is the chief of staff to governor john hickenlooper. they are all professionals in their career. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and then we will come down this way. >> thank you for the report. it provides a good framework for all of us to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform and colorado. our pension is about 69% solvent. we did a major reform in the last administration and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%, and so to give you a sense of how far they were beyond the state if the battle was whether or not the state has a right to ratchet down the cola for our state employees that we could see the need to go to 25% compensation by 2020, so it's very important that we are able to give you the litigation in terms
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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